fbpx

THINGS NO ONE EVER TELLS YOU ABOUT PERFUME- part 2

February 23, 2021

In our previous blog, we've told you about 5 things no one ever tells you about perfume. And because our mission is to provide you with knowledge that will make your shopping experience and perfume use as easy and fun as possible, we have prepared a second round of must-know things no one tells you about perfume.

Perfume (Photo: Pexels)

6. Can perfume be an aphrodisiac?

"Perfume is an aphrodisiac as certain notes have the power to trigger a biochemical response and arousal in both men and women."

Perfume can undoubtedly make the wearer feel sexy. Although scent is subjective, there is proof that certain notes trigger a biochemical response and arousal in both men and women. Artificial fragrances have been used for thousands of years to manipulate personal odor. And although you are likely to be attracted to any scent that reminds you of your lover, fragrances like ginger, vanilla, rose, jasmine, saffron, cinnamon and others, may prompt an instant attraction and intuitive sensual response as these scents are proven aphrodisiacs.

7. Mixing scents?

"Not such a great idea, because if you try out more than three fragrances in a row, you can suffer from olfactory fatigue."

Not a great idea. »When shopping in a store, only test two fragrances at a time ... one on either arm,« says Milèo, from Milèo Ney York. Why? Experts say that if you try out more than three fragrances in a row, you can suffer from olfactory fatigue. That is why you see coffee beans in perfume stores. They help consumers clear and rest their nasal passages, so they can test out and smell more fragrances at the time.

Lotion (Photo: Pexels)

8. Applying lotion first?

"Hydrated, warm skin holds fragrance best, so apply your perfume right after the shower or bath."

Before applying any fragrance, you might want to dab your skin with your favorite lotion to moisturize the area. »Hydrated, warm skin holds fragrance best, so apply your perfume right after the shower or bath,« says Milèo. »If you're already up and about, simply apply a lip balm to your pulse points (wrists, neck, elbows) and then apply perfume to those spots. The waxy texture of the balm will melt as your skin heats up to hold the fragrance and help it last longer.«

9. Does perfume impact mood?

"Aristotle and Plato described olfactory perception as strongly related to human emotions."

In the ancient Greco‐Latin civilizations, Aristotle and Plato described olfactory perception as strongly related to human emotions (LeGuérer, 1992) Different perfumes have their own impact on the mood because of the various ingredients that can lift up your spirits. Research, conducted in 2005 (A.N. Rétiveau, E. Chambers & G.A. Milliken) showed that pleasant fragrances can positively influence mood and specific sensory characteristics. However, Milèo points out that: »the catch is the fragrance must be organic or botanically-based, not synthetic.« So try some organic fragrances based on lavender, rose or grapefruit notes.

10. Rubbing your wrists when applying perfume?

"Not recommender, because if you rub your wrists together, you spoil those light-molecule top notes as the friction between the perfume and your skin's natural oils »rushes the fragrance."

While spraying perfume on your wrists is the correct move (applying it to pulse points), rubbing them together is not recommended. Typically, complex scents are a combination of top notes, heart notes and base notes. Top notes are more delicate, lighter, and dissipate most quickly; base notes are heavier molecules, longer-lasting. And if you rub your wrists together right after putting on your favorite fragrance, you spoil those light-molecule top notes. The friction between the perfume and your skin's natural oils »rushes the fragrance,« says Mr. Frémont, a Master Perfumer. In effect, he says, you're fast-forwarding your scent experience, bypassing the opening and going straight to the heart notes and like-so dull out the top notes of a fragrance.

BACK TO BLOG